Hunting Bullet Guide – 375 Winchester

Winchester introduced the 375 Winchester in 1978 along with the Model 94 “Big-Bore” lever-action rifle. The “Big-bore” is simply a heavy- duty version of the standard 94. After the success I had with the cartridge in the T/C Contender I found and bought a used 94 Big-bore rifle.

X375W - 375 Winchester

  • Ballistic Coefficient: 0.215
  • Product Symbol: X375W
  • Description: Rapid, controlled expansion. Penetrates thin skin, light muscle and bone. For antelope, deer, black bear.

Rifle Ballistics

Distance (yds) Muzzle 50 100 200 300 400 500
Velocity (fps) 2200 1841 1526 1268 1089 980
Distance (yds) Muzzle 50 100 200 300 400 500
Energy (ft. lbs.) 2150 1506 1034 714 527 427
Distance (yds)   50 100 150 200 250 300
Short Trajectory (in.)   +0.6 0.0 -3.2 -9.5 -19.5 -33.8
Distance (yds) 100 150 200 250 300 400 500
Long Trajectory (in.) +2.1 0.0 -5.2 -14.1 -27.4 -70.1 -138.1

200 gr. Super-X® Power-Point®

My first experience with the 375 Winchester came one spring afternoon while hunting wild hogs. On this hunt I was using a Super 14” Thompson/Center Contender. Loaded with one of my hand loads using a 220-grain Barnes Flat-point and a maximum charge of Reloader 7. I had seen several hogs that afternoon moving along the tree line. As the evening begin to approach a caught nice boar crossing the open field. Getting a solid rest out of the box blind window I settled the cross hairs on his shoulder and slowly begin to squeeze the trigger. Suddenly the gun bucked and I heard the loud whack as the bullet found its target at 148 long steps. Upon inspecting the boar I found the bullet had broken both shoulders and cut a large blood channel though the chest. I’ve taken several hogs, even a couple over 300 pounds, since then with the same results. Winchester introduced the 375 Winchester in 1978 along with the Model 94 “Big-Bore” lever-action rifle. The “Big-bore” is simply a heavy- duty version of the standard 94. After the success I had with the cartridge in the T/C Contender I found and bought a used 94 Big-bore rifle. Accuracy was quite good. Right around 2” +/- at 75 yards using open sights. Recoil is a little stiff but not as bad as the 444 Marlin or the 45-70 Government in the same weight gun. In my opinion the 375 Winchester is a much better round for hunting deer, wild hogs, or other similar game that the 30-30 Winchester or the 35 Remington. Unfortunately it is not as popular as the before mentioned cartridges. To my knowledge Winchester is the only company to offer factory ammunition for the round. Only two bullet weights are available a 200 and 250-grain flat-nose. I have fired the 250-grain load in my Contender and accuracy was in the 2” range at 100 yards. I never did hunt with this particular load but I’m sure it would do just fine inside 200 yards for any game in Texas. The cartridge is a pleasure to reload. The case is rimed, strait walled and very durable. I never had problems finding bullets but other components are scarce as hen’s teeth. Winchester is the only company that produces brass and it seems only in small numbers. As mentioned before my best hand load used a Barnes 220-grain flat-nose. Performance being what it is with this round it’s hard to understand why it didn’t catch on more than it did in the hunting world. I have owned many single-shot pistols and my T/C Contender in 375 Winchester was one of the best.

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